Adventist News

  • Hope Studios From Disappointment to Hope Unraveling the Story of Seventh-day Adventism Through Film

    Rooted in the religious fervor of 19th-century America, the Seventh-day Adventist Church emerged from the teachings of William Miller, a Baptist preacher whose prediction of the Second Coming of Christ sparked the Great Disappointment of 1844. From this arose a new movement, led by figures such as Ellen G. White, Joseph Bates, and James White, who emphasized Sabbath observance, healthy living, and a belief in the imminent return of Christ. The SDA church, with its rich tapestry of history and belief, stands as a testament to the enduring power of faith and community. Throughout its history, Adventism has faced challenges and controversies, yet it has also left an indelible mark on society. From its establishment of educational institutions like Loma Linda University and Andrews University to its emphasis on healthcare through institutions such as the AdventHealth System, the church has sought to promote holistic well-being and social responsibility. Today, boasting a global membership of over 20 million individuals spanning nearly 200 countries, the Seventh-day Adventist Church remains dedicated to its core values of health, education, and community service. Its influence continues to shape its identity and mission in the 21st century. As we cast our gaze toward the future, the Seventh-day Adventist Church remains a beacon of hope and inspiration. Reflecting on its journey through history, we are reminded of the resilience of faith and the power of collective action. In this spirit, Hope Studios, the cinematic arm of Hope Channel International, is excited to announce their upcoming film, The Hopeful, which aims to celebrate the enduring legacy of the early Adventist church. Join them on this cinematic journey as they inspire audiences and explore the timeless truths and values that continue to define our church. The Hopeful will release in over 900 theaters nationwide this April 2024.

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  • Union Adventist University Union Offers Alcohol and Drug Counseling Career Emphasis

    In 2021, 46.3 million Americans fit the criteria for a substance use disorder, and the demand for licensed alcohol and drug counselors keeps rising. Union’s psychology program has responded to this need by creating a new emphasis; students who take this path will graduate ready to enter the workforce two to three years earlier as a provisional licensed alcohol and drug counselor (PLADC). Unlike most other psychology-related careers, a master’s degree is not required to become a licensed alcohol and drug counselor. As a PLADC, graduates can begin work right away in any inpatient or outpatient facility that provides services related to substance abuse. Under supervision, they then complete the on-the-job hours required to become a fully licensed counselor. “We’re focused on providing practical pathways for psychology majors,” said Trudy Holmes-Caines, director of Union’s psychology program. “Becoming a PLADC is a way to help students get their foot in the door and potentially get jobs that can support them as they pursue further education. There’s a lot of demand for people who have the skills to work with those who have substance abuse issues.” In fact, the employment rate for licensed alcohol and drug counselors is projected to grow by 22 percent over the next decade. Holmes-Caines said, “Alumni of our program started encouraging us to add this emphasis because they saw a need for people with these qualifications. We jumped on board because of what it could do for our students.” According to Vinita Sauder, Union’s president, the new emphasis is part of a long tradition. “As a Seventh-day Adventist university, an emphasis on healthy living has always been woven into the fabric of who we are,” Sauder said. “With these additional classes, we are now preparing the front-line professionals who can make a real difference in the lives of those who have developed harmful dependencies.” Junior psychology major Camryn Byers plans to become a marriage or domestic abuse counselor someday, but when she heard about the new emphasis, she quickly signed up. “Even though addiction counseling is not necessarily the specialty I want to end up in, drug and alcohol abuse is everywhere.” she said. “No matter what field I’m in, I’ll run into it, and I’ll already have so much knowledge about it. Plus, I’ll have a full-time job. When I go to graduate school, I won’t just be working some part-time gig somewhere, I’ll be actually moving forward in the field I want.” Becoming a licensed alcohol and drug counselor is not only beneficial for those pursuing a career in mental health care, but also for those preparing to provide spiritual or physical support. Brad Shay, adjunct professor of psychology and owner of Harmony Health Centers, said, “For students on track to become a pastor, it’s good to know about substance use disorders because they’ll see a lot of that in their parishioners. If you’re going into international rescue and relief, it’s good to see how substance use disorders are associated with traumatic and extreme situations, because that way you’re more prepared when you’re dealing with the percentage of the population that has substance use disorders.” Union’s psychology program already taught nine of the 12 required classes for PLADC certification. With the addition of three new classes to the program, students pursuing their PLADC will be ready to take the licensing exam as soon as they graduate. One of these new classes, Medical and Psychosocial Aspects of Addiction, is Byers’ favorite. “We learn about different harmful drugs, the effects they have on the body and why they become addictive,” she said. “Professor Shay always ties what we’re learning in class to articles we see in the news. I’ve learned so much about the role that drugs play in our world.” When it comes to pursuing a degree in psychology at Union College, Byers believes she’s made the right choice. “I’m a third generation Union student, so choosing Union is a family tradition,” she said. “But now that I’m here, I don’t want to leave. It’s such a warm campus, and I love the atmosphere and friendships I’ve made in the psychology program. I’ve learned so much from my professors and I’m excited to apply that knowledge in my upcoming practicum and at my future jobs.” Annika Cambigue is a senior communication and English major at Union College.

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  • Winterset Members Mingle at Local County Fair

    Last July the Winterset Seventh-day Adventist Church hosted a health booth at the local Madison County Fair. Even though the traffic was light, God used the booth in a mighty way. The team did 45 health assessments, which included blood glucose, cholesterol, blood pressure, BMI, and respiratory status, along with a questionnaire that looked at health age vs. chronological age. Participants’ answers were then put into a computer, giving them a printout with the two ages and lifestyle changes they could implement to improve their health. We received eight requests for Bible studies, and 20 people were interested in learning to cook healthy meals. The team also gave out literature free of charge, including around 30 Great Controversies, so many vegetarian cookbooks that we ran out, and many other pamphlets. The team also made balloon animals for the children. Our goal for next year is to add more for the children and teens. We gave away four oriole feeders as door prizes, and around 150 people signed up for them. It was a blessing to mingle with God’s people in this setting. Connie Richards is a member of the Winterset Seventh-day Adventist Church.

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  • Dakota Conference Beyond Borders Serving with Love and Purpose in Ukraine

    I’ve learned that all God wants from us is to surrender and go wherever He opens the way. Nothing else depends on us – not our skills, schedule, resources or talents. We are only called to be faithful, and God takes that and makes it more than we could have ever expected or imagined. This fall, I had the privilege of spending two weeks serving in Ukraine. We chose to walk where Jesus walked, among the least of these, the sick, and the broken-hearted. Our focus was on their well-being, praying for peace, and addressing their deepest needs – whether physical or the need for a listening ear and a loving heart. During this trip, I was part of a pop-up clinic based in the local Adventist school, with over 10 different departments offering primary care, neurology, OB/GYN, mental health, dentistry, physical therapy, orthopedics, massage therapy, ENT, chaplaincy, imaging, diagnostics and more. In four days, we served 1,069 patients, providing 827 consultations with different specialists, 243 dentist visits, 809 analyses, 4,544 medical services, and 590 individual chaplaincy communications. With 55 Americans and 145 Ukrainians (totaling 200 volunteers) we made a significant impact. One day, after clinic hours, my Ukrainian friend Marina and I strolled around the clinic site. We ended up at chaplaincy, where we visited with a local pastor conducting spiritual counseling. He shared a conversation he had with an older Ukrainian woman who wondered why Americans would come so far to help. The pastor used this opportunity to explain the gospel and the love of Christ, and because the volunteers are Christians, they love as He loved and want to serve as He served. Overwhelmed, the woman requested Bible studies because she wanted to understand and know a love that deep. While working in the lab, I was impressed to pray with a lady before a blood draw. Through my translator, I asked if we could pray with her. She eagerly agreed, and after the prayer, she hugged us, tearfully expressing how touched she was. The medical work and week-long evangelistic series led to six people being baptized into the local church. Those engaged in Christlike ministry know the true meaning of happiness, as I experienced in Ukraine. The joy and happiness that came from serving these wonderful people reminded me once again that it truly is more blessed to give than to receive. 1 Cor. 15:58 says, “Always give yourself fully to the work of the Lord, because you know that your labor in the Lord is not in vain.” In a world where various priorities are emphasized, and society often directs us toward a certain lifestyle, this verse serves as a powerful reminder that the Lord’s labor is the only lasting work. So let us give ourselves fully to the labor of Christ. I believe that every resource, gift, attainment, talent and possession is entrusted to us for one purpose – to faithfully give it back to God, further His kingdom, and spread the gospel. God blesses us so we can experience the joy of giving wholeheartedly and pouring everything out for others in response to love. He desires each of us to experience that extent of joy, and this gospel truth is the only reason we, as humans, are on this earth: to totally surrender, freely give and completely live for the love of Jesus Christ! Mindy Schumacher is a registered nurse and member of the Lehr Adventist Church in North Dakota. She plans to return to Ukraine in 2024 to serve in the Adventist Sanitarium of Черешенняка (Chereshenka) during the months of January and February.

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Blogs

  • The Teacher’s Notes–Blessed Is He Who Comes in the Name of the Lord, Lesson 9 Adult Bible Study Guide, 2024 1Q, "Psalms"

    Sabbath School Lesson for February 24-March 1, 2024 Overview of Lesson 9, Blessed Is He Who Comes in the Name of the Lord Memory Text: “The stone which the builders rejected has become the chief cornerstone. This was the Lord’s doing; it is marvelous in our eyes.” Psalm 118:22, 23 NKJV In the book of Psalms, there are many chapters and verses that help us identify the promised Messiah, known as the Chief Cornerstone of God’s church. Just as Christ is found throughout the Bible, He’s a central figure in the Psalms as well. His identity, the nature of His ministry on earth, His sacrificial death and amazing resurrection, and His role as our Intercessor and Judge in the courts above, are all predicted by the psalmists, speaking centuries before the birth of Jesus. Some psalms help us see Christ as the supreme King and Judge (Psalms 24, 45, 72, and 101). And others share with us the priestly prayers and suffering He endured here on earth, such as in Psalms 88 and 102. It’s always good to meditate on the Messiah, Savior of the world. He plays a pivotal role in our salvation, making us want to know as much about Him as we can. The Psalms are a valuable guide and resource in understanding God’s dear Son and what He endured for us. Sunday: Divine Self-Sacrificing Shepherd–What makes Him the “Good Shepherd” and not just a hireling? (Ps. 23) Monday: The Suffering Messiah–Why did He suffer so much on earth? (Ps. 22) Tuesday: Forever Faithful to His Covenant–How has God been faithful to us, and how are we unfaithful to Him? (Ps. 89) Wednesday: Eternal King of Unrivaled Power–Why is He seen as a victorious King? (Ps. 2) Thursday: Eternal Priest in the Order of Melchizedek–What kind of Priest is He? (Ps. 110) Sunday: Divine Self-Sacrificing Shepherd (Ps. 23) Until Jesus came to earth, the imagery of a shepherd as being a type of the Messiah was only partially seen and understood. The kings and prophets, who cared for the people as their shepherds, were inadequate representations of the Good Shepherd. Being human, they often failed in their responsibility to care for the people (2 Samuel 5:2). Jesus clarified His enhanced role as Shepherd by contrasting His pastoral duties with those who were hired by the owner, known as hirelings. Their connection with the sheep was not as strong as that of the Owner, who had a much deeper care for the sheep, even preferring to die than neglect or lose one of them. And Jesus, also called the sacrificial Lamb of God, ultimately did die for us (John 1:29), showing that He was both divine and human in nature–both Shepherd and Lamb. In John 10, Jesus explained the role of the Good Shepherd very well. We also see that role described beautifully in Psalm 23. Our total dependence on Him is seen clearly in this psalm. He is not just a shepherd, but the Good Shepherd–above all the rest. He cares for ALL our needs. Bible Verses: Psalm 23,  Psalm 28:9, 78:52, 79:13, 80:1, and 100:3 Why is the Messiah thought of as the Good Shepherd, and not just a hireling? John 10:11-16 and John 1:29 Why was Jesus both the Shepherd and the Lamb of God? What might being both divine and human have to do with Him having these roles? Monday: The Suffering Messiah (Ps. 22) Although several psalms speak of suffering and pain (Psalm 42, 88, and 102), none of them point to the actual events in the life of the Messiah as it is found in Psalm 22. We hear in this Psalm the words of the mocking crowds that surrounded Jesus on the cross (Psalm 22:7, 8), and also His own words (Psalm 22:1), as He was dying in front of those who had treated Him so brutally. Piercing His hands and feet (Psalm 22:16) and dividing His garments and casting lots for them (Psalm 22:18) are all predicted in Psalm 22. The mental anguish of Jesus on the cross must have been the hardest to endure. He was not suffering for His own sin, as He had none, but was bearing the guilt of all the sins ever committed by mankind. No wonder He felt forsaken by His Father. And yet God was there in the earthquake and darkness that surrounded Him, later orchestrating His resurrection, and finally uplifting Him to the position of being our victorious King and High Priest. Despite the rejection and hate He experienced on earth, God has glorified His Son’s sacrifice, making Him the chief cornerstone of His holy temple (Ephesians 2:20-22 and 1 Peter 2:4-8). Bible Verses: Psalm 22:1, Matthew 27:46, John 1:1, 2, and 10:30 How do we know God had not forsaken His Son? Psalm 22:7, 8 and Matthew 27:43 In what way was Jesus tempted by the mocking crowd? Psalm 22:18 and Matthew 27:35 Why was it significant that they divided His garments and cast lots for them? What does this tell us? Tuesday: Forever Faithful in His Covenant (Ps. 89) From time to time, God has made covenant promises, all pertaining to how He would redeem men and women from their fallen, sinful state. Adam, Noah, Abraham, Jacob, and David–all of them were given messages of hope that helped them through their times of suffering. And all of these promises pointed in some way to the coming Messiah, who would also suffer. Although specifically mentioning the covenant made to David, Psalm 89 gives all of us glimpses into the life of the One who would come to this world as our Savior. Notice in Psalm 89:9, for example, it mentions One who would still the waves of the raging sea. See also Psalm 65:7 and 107:29. This event had its fulfillment in the life of Jesus when He rebuked the winds and waves and saved the disciples’ boat from sinking (Matthew 3:23-27). The disciple John recognized the Messiah as the Creator (John The Teacher’s Notes–Blessed Is He Who Comes in the Name of the Lord, Lesson 9 Adult Bible Study Guide, 2024 1Q, “Psalms”“>Read more…

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  • #TuesdayTalk: Have Faith in God A Poem from My Dad

    Last month, I lost my dad to cancer. The way we speak about loss is strange. I lost him, and after almost ten years of obvious cognitive decline, it seemed he also lost himself. It may have seemed so, but Dad was never lost. At times, he might have forgotten our names. He might’ve forgotten the year or the president, but he never forgot his faith. That’s because God never forgot him. This poem was read at Dad’s funeral on January 9, 2024. “Have Faith in God” By James Edwin Moore (Nov 17, 1950 – Jan 6, 2024) Have faith in God – With hope and deep concern, Have faith in God – For Christ, lamps will burn; Have faith in God – And pray for His return. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith in God – That Baby in a manger; Who came down as a stranger; To save us all from danger. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith in God – A cure for all men’s sorrow– Where hope and joy are borrowed; Have faith He’ll save tomorrow. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith His victory is right; Through all the dark days and the bright; On the world’s last Saturday night. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith in God’s refining; Even as this world’s declining, Gospel lamps are shining. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith in God’s Word speaking Doubt fear and wayward creaking! It’s His true light we’re seeking. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith in God’s Son who came; Fulfilling the time and place and name; As His prophets foretold the same. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith because Babylon fell; And Persia, Greece, and Rome as well; And history tells His story well. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith when hope is dim; When joy is to the brim; Put your health and life with Him. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith in what you see His two great books agree; Nature and scripture for you and me. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith, though men debate it; Though some may even hate it; He loves all those He created! Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith and Seek so you will find Gold richer than ever mined; And His Word so wondrous kind. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith and take your daily bread; For eternal life, He said, Christ was resurrected from the dead. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith in God to rise above the hate; And still, for glory wait; Come now by the open gate. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith that Christ will set us free; His glory we will see Blest hope for you and me. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith He will answer every prayer; When days are dark or fair, Pray now and everywhere. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith in the Father of our race Filled with mercy, love, and grace; Look forward to seeing His kind face. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith He will re-create; For a new life, none need to wait; This love and power we celebrate. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith He’ll meet our every need; Always provide and always lead; And for His Spirit plead. Have faith, dear friend, in God. Have faith, dear friend, in God.

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  • The Teacher’s Notes–Wisdom for Righteous Living, Lesson 8 Adult Bible Study Guide, 2024 1Q, "Psalms"

    Sabbath School Lesson for February 17-23, 2024 Overview of Lesson 8, Wisdom for Righteous Living Memory Text: “So teach us to number our days, that we may gain a heart of wisdom.” Psalm 90:12 NKJV What this verse says is that we should live each day as if it’s our last. It speaks volumes for how each of us are to live our whole lives in a way that glorifies our heavenly Father. Many of the psalms help us deal with our emotions, both positive and negative ones: anxiety, guilt, sorrow, gratitude and joy. What many of us overlook though is what we can learn from them about the wisdom it takes to live happy, meaningful, productive lives, bringing us more of those positive emotions. For this, we can go to the wisdom, or sapiential, literature of the Bible: the books of Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes. Several psalms, however, also contribute to our understanding of the experience, knowledge, and good judgment required to live righteously. These psalms include: Psalms 1, 19, 32, 34, 37, 49, 73, 112, 119, 127, 128, and 133. What to expect from this study about wisdom in the book of Psalms: Sunday: Your Word I Have Hidden in My Heart–What value is there in memorizing Scripture, a way to hide His word in our heart? (Ps. 119:11) Monday: Teach Us to Number Our Days–How and why should we number our days? (Ps. 90:12) Tuesday: The Lord’s Test–In what ways do we test God? (Ps. 95:8, 9) Wednesday: Deceitfulness of the Wicked Way–What kind of temptations do we face in life? (Ps. 141:4) Thursday: Blessings of Righteous Living–What are the benefits of living wisely before God? (Ps. 1:3) Sunday: Your Word Have I Hidden in My Heart (Ps. 119:11) The major theme of Psalm 119, the longest chapter in the Bible, is the Torah, or God’s Law. It isn’t limited to the Torah portion of Scriptures though, but seems to include all of God’s word. In other words, the whole Bible is helpful in understanding how we are to live our lives wisely and righteously. Walking “in the law of the Lord” can only be done effectively when we do it with our whole heart (Psalm 119:1, 2). Verse 1 mentions being “undefiled”, a word that described the animal sacrifices brought to the sanctuary. Keep in mind that we are to give ourselves to Him as “a living sacrifice” (Romans 12:1), and are therefore to be “undefiled”, or as perfect as possible. We can only do this with God’s law in our heart. He gives us the strength to keep His law. Hiding His word in our heart is mentioned in Psalm 119:11. We remember what we value, and memorizing Scripture is a worthy practice. Those things we value and have memorized will be remembered more easily when we need them. Just like how Christ withstood Satan’s temptations in the wilderness (Matthew 4:1-11), we, too, need to “hide” God’s word in our hearts, so we can handle temptations that come our way. Bible Verses: Psalms 119:1-16, 161-168 Why do so many people hate God’s law, rather than love it? It seems that even Christians are hesitant to talk about the Law. Why isn’t the Law more popular than it is? Monday: Teach Us to Number Our Days (Ps. 90:12) Wisdom is achieved by first recognizing our weak, limited condition as humans. Many times, the psalmists compare us to grass. Grass, which is probably the weakest of all plant life, comes and goes quickly (Psalm 90:5, 6, 103:15, 16). This is why we are admonished to “number our days”, similar to what one would do if they knew they had but a short time to live (Psalm 90:12). The fact is, all of us do have but a short time to live. Seventy or eighty years is mentioned as the amount of time we usually have (Psalms 90:10). Before we know it, we are seniors, wondering where all the years have gone. Compared to God’s eternity, our short lifetime is nothing–like a watch in the night, typically three or four hours long (Psalm 90:4). No wonder we are to cherish each moment and make the best of the short time we have on earth. With this humbled mindset, we are ready to tackle our circumstances using wiser, healthier, more thoughtful attitudes and actions. Having humility is a great way to get ourselves on the path of wisdom. Bible Verses: Psalm 90 Why is it helpful for those living in the last days to remember that God’s timetable is different than our own? (Psalm 90:4 and 2 Peter 3:8, 9) What does it mean to “fly away” as mentioned in Psalm 90:10? How does numbering our days bring us a heart of wisdom (Psalm 90:12)? How does it usually change how we live and think? Tuesday: The Lord’s Test (Ps. 105) When we think of the Lord’s test, what usually comes to mind is how God tests us through our trials and difficulties. These tests are valuable in building our faith and preventing us from repeating mistakes in the future. Many stories in the Bible are about people who were tested by God (Psalm 81:7, and 105:17-19). Failing the Lord’s test by rejecting His guidance can have disastrous results. Our disobedience not only grows our stubbornness, but hardens our heart, sometimes even destroying the faith of those around us. There’s another kind of test we mustn’t forget. The Lord is tested, too, by our willful disobedience (Psalm 95:8, 9). We challenge His patience and love all the time, and yet God always passes His test by continuing to draw us to Him, and forgiving us when we repent. Bible Verses: Psalm 81:7, 8 and 105:17-22 What other examples are there of God’s testing us? Psalm 95:7-11 How and why is God tested? What’s the main difference between His test and ours? Wednesday: Deceitfulness of the Wicked Way (Ps. 141) Psalm 141 is a prayer, asking that we be kept safe The Teacher’s Notes–Wisdom for Righteous Living, Lesson 8 Adult Bible Study Guide, 2024 1Q, “Psalms”“>Read more…

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  • Outlook magazine Throw Me To The Fish

    Had there been a psychiatrist  in Joppa that Jonah could visit, he would likely have diagnosed him as Passive Aggressive. This is one of my favorite personality disorders since you can fairly well predict what a person is going to do. It’s not what they say so much, it’s what they do or don’t do that matters, and its usually the opposite of what they should do. I mean, who in their right mind openly says No to God? You say Yes of course and then proceed to No. I wonder if Jonah said yes to God and then turned around and went the other way. How could he do that? He had to hear God’s voice giving him directions. He had to recognize the authority  of God. Yet, he didn’t know God well enough to know what God expected and the lengths God would go to carry out Jonahs assigned mission. Jonah knew God, but I doubt he KNEW God. Many of us today fall into this same predicament. We know just enough about God to say that we know what He wants for us and expects of us, but we don’t seem to know how he has set plans in motion to see us through to the other side. We too can say yes to God in this manner and then turn right around and go in the other direction. This lack of experience and trust in God is a learning point for us. Jonah seems to get it for a short while and even acts nobly among the crew of the ship as they are about to drown. He once again knows God and what He will do. In verse 12 of the first chapter, He tells the crew, “Pick me up and throw me into the sea.” Jonah does not seem to know that he is on a bus route and that his bus is being prepared for his pickup. He just knows that God will sink that boat if he remains on it. We don’t arrive at the bus stop until verse 17, where God, who seems to have a thing for fish, calls one forth from the ocean so that the great creature can give Jonah a lift. Turns out Jonah had gone so far away from God’s map that it took some three days of travel to get him back to where he was supposed to be going. Three days to think about life and what you are going to do with your one very precious and wild life. For some of us, it’s more like 3 years or more. Seems like it was enough to get Jonah back on track, even though he will have more problems to come. More on those later. In the meantime, the lesson to learn here is what? I’m just spitballing here, but let me suggest this. With God, you never know what He is going to do or ask you to do. Got that? But you can be sure, that He knows, and if He calls you, He already has a plan and all the resources needed to accomplish that plan. You may think the worst, you could die, your family will be destitute, or your life will somehow turn out miserably. This is a failure to really KNOW God. We may know enough about Him to know something of His personality and even what He expects, but KNOWING Him is another matter. That kind of knowledge is to be sought after. I hope it only takes three days to obtain it.

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